CAGED Twisted inventor of Blue Whale suicide game linked to deaths of 130 Russian kids is sentenced to three years in Siberian hard labour camp

Ilya Sidorov was convicted of running an online group where he attempted to convince up to 32 teens to harm themselves or take their own lives

10 September 2018 - 08:30 - Update: 10 September 2018 - 08:37

ONE of the masterminds behind the sick Blue Whale suicide game has been sentenced to three years in a Siberian labour camp.

Ilya Sidorov was found guilty of trying to convince a school girl to kill herself as part of a twisted online game.

The postman operated a "group of death" on social media in which users perform tasks set by a mystery "curator".

This twisted game included telling vulnerable teens to self harm and even kill themselves and grabbed headlines around the world after it emerged in Russia in 2016.

Sidorov, 26, operated under the screen name “Ilya Spartak” on Russian social media site VKontakte.

He was convicted of trying to coax a 14-year-old girl into killing herself and then trying to extort her for cash when she failed to end he life.

 Ilya Sidorov, 26, confessed to seeking to coax members of a sick social media group into killing themselves
East2west News
Ilya Sidorov, 26, confessed to seeking to coax members of a sick social media group into killing themselves
 Sidorov operated under the screen name “Ilya Spartak” on Russian social media site VKontakte
East2west News
Sidorov operated under the screen name “Ilya Spartak” on Russian social media site VKontakte

The teen, who has not been named, was rushed to hospital last year following a failed suicide attempt.

She received a barrage of abuse and death threats online before she tried to poison herself.

Shortly after the attempt her foster mum found the internet conversations with Sidorov and contacted police.

FOR KIDS: How to say no

It can sometimes be hard to stand up to your friends, so Childline offers the following tips on how to say no:

1) Say it with confidence:
Be assertive. It’s your choice and you don’t have to do something which makes you feel unsafe or uncomfortable.

2) Try not to judge them:
By respecting their choices, they should respect yours.

3) Spend time with friends who can say ‘no’:
It takes confidence and courage to say no to your friends. Spend time with other friends who also aren’t taking part.

4) Suggest something else to do:
If you don’t feel comfortable doing what your friends are doing, suggest something else to do.

Any child worried about peer pressure or online worries can contact Childline on 0800 1111.

 Sidorov was arrested in June 2017 over the sick crimes
East2west News
Sidorov was arrested in June 2017 over the sick crimes

At least 32 children were subjected to Sidorov's depraved treatment according to the Russian Interior Ministry.

Cops collared the postal worker when he arrived in court for an open hearing in June.

The horrifyingly dangerous game has been linked to at least 130 teen deaths across Russia.

a group administrator assigns daily tasks to members, which they have to complete over 50 days.

 The girl who died was from the village of Yetkul in the Chelyabinsk Oblast region of Russia
East2west News
The girl who died was from the village of Yetkul in the Chelyabinsk Oblast region of Russia
 The girls carer, Iraida Ryzhenkova, found the sick messages from the postman
East2west News
The girls carer, Iraida Ryzhenkova, found the sick messages from the postman

 

 

FOR PARENTS: How to talk about peer pressure

1) Create the right situation:

Make sure you both have time to talk, the atmosphere is relaxed, and remember that this is a conversation, not an interrogation.

2) Listen:
Avoid solely talking at them. Listen to their concerns and their experiences.

3) Acknowledge their worries:
Dismissing their feelings will only shut down the conversation and make them reluctant to talk about what’s bothering them.

4) Help them practise ways of saying no:
Rehearsing with them ways to stand up to peer pressure and coming up with alternatives for them will build their confidence.

5) Keep the conversation going:
Let them know that they can always come to you if they have more worries, and take an interest in how they get on saying “no”.

Any adult who wants advice on how to talk to their child about peer pressure can contact the NSPCC Helpline on 0808 800 5000.

 

 Veronika Volkova was killed in February 2017 with investigators saying she was a victim of the Blue Whale phenomenon
Siberian times
Veronika Volkova was killed in February 2017 with investigators saying she was a victim of the Blue Whale phenomenon
 Yulia Konstantinova, 15, jumped to her death from a 14-storey block of flats in Krasnoyarsk, Siberia last year
The Siberian Times
Yulia Konstantinova, 15, jumped to her death from a 14-storey block of flats in Krasnoyarsk, Siberia last year
 A 17-year-old Russian girl also accused of driving teens to their deaths last year
 
A 17-year-old Russian girl also accused of driving teens to their deaths last year

The horrific tasks include self-harming, watching horror movies and waking up at unusual hours, but these gradually get more extreme.

On the 50th day, the controlling manipulators behind the game reportedly instruct the youngsters to commit suicide.

In June of this year financial analyst Nikita Nearonov was also accused of being a ringleader within the game.

 Nikita Nearonov, 22, is accused of encouraging at least ten teenage girls to attempt suicide, police say
East2west News
Nikita Nearonov, 22, is accused of encouraging at least ten teenage girls to attempt suicide, police say

Police believe he may be a “major and dangerous” perpetrator of the twisted Blue Whale "game".

He allegedly selected potential victims from vulnerable teenagers he connected to online.

A police source claimed Nearonov sent messages “almost around the clock, from home or at work” encouraging them to carry out activities that could lead to suicide.

He is also accused of training other masterminds in the lethal Blue Whale game

The NSPCC say children should remember not to follow the crowd and not feel pressured into doing anything that makes them feel unsafe.

A spokesperson said: “Children can find it difficult to stand up to peer pressure but they must know it’s perfectly okay to refuse to take part in crazes that make them feel unsafe or scared.

“Parents should talk with their children and emphasise that they can make their own choices and discuss ways of how to say no.

“Reassuring a child that they can still be accepted even if they don’t go along with the crowd will help stop them doing something that could hurt them or make them uncomfortable.”

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